Prevention

 


Here in Maine, tick season goes well beyond Spring, Summer and Fall. Ticks can remain active year round in temperatures 35 degrees and warmer and in colder temps, they hibernate. So how can you protect yourself and your family from exposure to tick-borne disease?


1)  Treat your clothing (outerwear, shoes, hats, gloves) with Permethrin or purchase clothing infused with Permethrin

Permethrin is an insecticide in the pyrethroid family. Pyrethroids are synthetic chemicals that act like natural extracts from the chrysanthemum flower. Permethrin can affect insects if they eat it or touch it. Permethrin affects the nervous system in insects, causing muscle spasms, paralysis and death.

To apply, spray clothing generously with Permethrin and allow to fully dry.  Once dried, it is safe to touch as the permethrin adheres to the fabric and last through 7-10 washings.  You can purchase the Permethrin and treat your own clothing and outerwear or purchase clothing infused with permethrin that lasts up to 70 washings.



2)  Treat your skin with your choice of repellent

For years, DEET products were all we had to choose from but now there are more options, natural and organic options available. Products containing picardin (derived from hot chili peppers) and essential oils are fast becoming a household choice for safety and effectiveness. The CDC released a statement concerning toxic buildup when using DEET products on children and the negative health effects it can produce (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/tf.asp?id=1035&tid=201). When choosing a safe repellent for your children, choose one that has no more than 10-30% concentration of DEET. Sawyer's 20% Picaridin insect repellent is safe for use during pregnancy and on kids as young as six months of age. It is odorless and lasts 12-14 hours.




3)  Treat your pets

Our pets love to be outside and roaming around and they are just as susceptible to tick exposure as humans.  Keeping your pets away from tall grass and wooded areas decreases their exposure to ticks, thus decreasing the odds of getting bit.  Many reliable products are available to prevent your dog from getting fleas and ticks. These can include oral medications as well as “spot on” or topical formulas that are applied directly to your pet’s skin. Not all preventives are the best choice for every pet, however, and some pets may have adverse reactions to a certain product. Be sure to talk with your vet about flea- or tick-control options, including any over-the-counter products, before using them on your dog or puppy. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) advises:
Parasite protection is not ‘one-size-fits-all.’ Certain factors affect the type and dose of the product that can be used, including the age, species, breed, lifestyle, and health status of your pet, as well as any medications your pet is receiving. Caution is advised when considering flea/tick treatment of very young and very old pets. Use a flea comb on puppies and kittens that are too young for flea/tick products. Some products should not be used on very old pets. Some breeds are sensitive to certain ingredients that can make them extremely ill. Flea and tick preventives and some medications can interfere with each other, resulting in unwanted side effects, toxicities, or even ineffective doses. It’s important that your veterinarian is aware of all of your pet’s medications when considering the optimal flea and tick preventive for your pet.”
  • Vaccination. There are vaccines available that can help prevent your dog from getting Lyme disease. These can involve an initial shot and a booster given several weeks later, with annual vaccination following. They may not be appropriate for some dogs, however. Talk with your vet if you have questions about the vaccine and the best Lyme prevention protocol for your dog overall.
4)  Treat your yards

Whether you have a play area for your kids and pets or live near a protected wetland area, there are many options in treating your yard to repel ticks, from Do-It-Yourself sprays and granules to hiring a company to come and treat your lawn but safety and the environment must always be considered. For more information about chemical lawn treatments or natural organic options, please visit http://www.maine.gov/dacf/php/gotpests/bugs/tick-mosquito-companies.htm to find a pest control company nearest you, who are licensed and well experienced in keeping Maine yards safe and tick free for you, for your children and for your pets.



5) Treat your home

Ticks enter our homes in many ways ~ on our clothing and on our pets.  Essential oils are becoming more and more useful in so many ways and proven to be effective in repelling ticks. Many cleaning and laundry products contain essential oils such as Lemongrass, Eucalyptus, Rosemary, Cedarwood. You can also:  Add a few drops into your preferred cleaning product, spritz your bedding, treat your furniture and pet bedding with permethrin (keep off until fully dried).


NOTE OF CAUTION:  ROSE GERANIUM AND TEA TREE OIL IS TOXIC TO PETS, CAUSING LIVER DAMAGE.  DO NOT USE THESE OILS ON OR AROUND PETS.




Lastly, when you come in from outside, toss your clothing in the dryer on HIGH HEAT for a minimum of 10 minutes and DO YOUR TICK CHECKS!  Ticks are drawn to moist areas so be sure to check EVERYWHERE! And if you find a tick, you have choices. 

The University of Maine Coop Extension's new Plant, Animal and Insect Laboratory is underway and due to open in 2017 (https://extension.umaine.edu/newlab/). Currently, they are only able to identify the type of tick, not if it is carrying a tick-borne disease.  The Bay Area Lyme Foundation, by way of a generous grant from the Cohen Family, is offering free tick testing and you can find information and directions for submission on their website http://www.bayarealyme.org/lyme-disease-prevention/tick-testing/

For more information about treatment guidelines https://www.guideline.gov/summaries/summary/49320 or to find a Lyme provider to determine if antibiotic treatment is necessary, please visit our REFERRAL tab.
Rose geranium oil is the most frequently cited essential oil for use as a tick repellent. Natural health sites such as the Care2 Network and Mother Earth News note its effectiveness, but little research has been done to provide clinical evidence. According to Garden Guides, rose geranium’s scientific name is Pelargonium graveolens. Its scent is reminiscent of roses, lemon and a hint of apple. Rose geranium oil has long been used as an antibacterial.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6550945_essential-oils-kill-ticks.html
Rose geranium oil is the most frequently cited essential oil for use as a tick repellent. Natural health sites such as the Care2 Network and Mother Earth News note its effectiveness, but little research has been done to provide clinical evidence. According to Garden Guides, rose geranium’s scientific name is Pelargonium graveolens. Its scent is reminiscent of roses, lemon and a hint of apple. Rose geranium oil has long been used as an antibacterial.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6550945_essential-oil
Natural alternatives for pest relief are in great demand. Essential oils are a popular choice, and some can repel ticks even if they don’t kill ticks. In 2004, Swedish researchers Gardulf, Wohlfart and Gustafson found that the mosquito repellent Citriodiol lessened tick attacks on people by 34 percent. The essential oils most commonly promoted as tick repellents include clove, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, geranium, palmarosa, pennyroyal, rose and sweet myrrh.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6550945_essential-oils-kill-ticks.html
Natural alternatives for pest relief are in great demand. Essential oils are a popular choice, and some can repel ticks even if they don’t kill ticks. In 2004, Swedish researchers Gardulf, Wohlfart and Gustafson found that the mosquito repellent Citriodiol lessened tick attacks on people by 34 percent. The essential oils most commonly promoted as tick repellents include clove, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, geranium, palmarosa, pennyroyal, rose and sweet myrrh.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6550945_essential-oils-kill-ticks.html

Natural alternatives for pest relief are in great demand. Essential oils are a popular choice, and some can repel ticks even if they don’t kill ticks. In 2004, Swedish researchers Gardulf, Wohlfart and Gustafson found that the mosquito repellent Citriodiol lessened tick attacks on people by 34 percent. The essential oils most commonly promoted as tick repellents include clove, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, geranium, palmarosa, pennyroyal, rose and sweet myrrh.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/list_6550945_essential-oils-kill-ticks.html

Essential Oils to Kill Ticks



Read more : http://www.